Man adjusts strap around hazmat suit of another person.
CSS staff train EPA Emergency Response team in using Level B PPE.

CSS scientists supporting the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) Scientific and Technical Assistance for Consequence Management (STACM) contract are experienced in EPA’s emergency response efforts, both natural and manmade. To help EPA staff prepare for these emergency response efforts, CSS staff provide yearly response training. The training includes review of respiratory protection equipment, operation checks, a review of Level C, B, and A personal protective equipment (PPE). The various levels of PPE required for hazard response personnel provide increasing protection based on the hazardous material personnel are addressing. Level D provides minimum protect required using equipment such as gloves, coveralls, safety glasses, face shields, and chemical-resistant steel-toed shoes. Level A provides the highest level of protection for when the greatest hazard potential exists.  

This equipment includes positive pressure, full face-piece self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA); totally encapsulated chemical- and vapor-protective suit; inner and outer chemical-resistant gloves; and disposable protective suit, gloves, and boots. During the training, CSS staff have EPA personnel with the opportunity to try on and test the Level A PPE to try and complete some dexterity tasks, which adds some fun and entertainment to the training.

Woman assists two people with trying on hazmat suits.
CSS staff train EPA emergency response staff in using Level A PPE. 

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